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Female Humans of HIIT Mental Health

Shahna Anstill

“I have danced since the age of 7, once I started intense dance training at university, age 19, I began doing more bootcamp sessions and conditioning along with my dance training. As a dancer the industry can be hard, you’re taught very early that to get jobs after you have graduated, you need to be a size 6/8 as they judge you on your appearance.

I was luckily already a size 6/8 but I developed an unhealthy relationship with food for about 2 years. This was because I was scared of putting weight on and not getting jobs after graduating. In my third year of university I tried to educate myself more with how nutrition will complement the exercise that I was doing, I fell in love with learning about this end after working abroad for a year dancing as well as leading activities like stretching and water aerobics, I took further action to gain qualifications to become a personal trainer.

I help loads of people with their health and well-being, but my main focus now is to also to help the dancers that need to be educated on how to fuel their bodies right, to get the most out of their training but to also fuel them for their long days of rehearsals and shows after graduating when they do get their jobs!”

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Humans of HIIT Mental Health Weight Loss

Pete McKinnon

“I have always had a bad relationship with my weight, I was always a big child and grew up thinking it was in my genes and bullied. However looking back I realise I just wasn’t very active, I didn’t play football or run, I played a bit of basketball and other than that I concentrated on my art.

Moving into my late teenage years into my 20s I went out a lot, drank too much and when I went to uni I ate too much pizza! To be honest I don’t think I ate too badly. It was the portion sizes where I was going wrong.

I met my partner Emma in 2009, at that point she was on a weightloss journey and it motivated me to do the same, I went to the gym I looked at what I ate and I lost 7st. However, less than 2 years later I put it back on again, because I wasn’t in the right mental space of mind. I was being told I looked Ill, or people said they preferred the old me! I worked as a regional manager for many years, meaning I was always out and didn’t really plan my food properly and didn’t have time for exercise (well I didn’t think I had time!) and this led to me getting bigger.

Roll on a number of years and we get to March 2019, my mum had developed Cancer and my partner Emma was being tested for Cancer. It made me look in the mirror and I did not like what I saw…..25 and a half stone and ridiculously unhealthy. So I changed….

I decided to walk my dog for an hour a day at least, I looked at my food and I increased my water intake.

I used MyFitnessPal to track my food and set myself a goal. The weight started coming off, I felt healthier, my mind was more at ease and my confidence grew. I set a goal of 7stone in a year for my birthday and I achieved it by the end of 2019.

My journey continues to develop as I push myself more and more, the weight loss started slowing down and I knew I needed to do more. I sponsor Guide Dogs for the Blind, and they text me about a new fundraising event called #100forguidedogs, and it was based around running, cycling or swimming and it came at a time that I was thinking of starting the Couch to 5k running program. So I used that as a motivator and started running to raise money.

I have now completed not only a 5k, but I regularly run 10K and recently completed my own half marathon. I am now into a new stage of my journey, introducing cross training to bring in new exercise to support my running but to also lose fat and build muscle.

To date I have lost just over 9stone, 13” around my waist, 8” around my hips and 12.5” around my chest.

I feel more confident, I have a newfound respect for exercise, I enjoy running and I enjoy my food.

It isn’t all about diets or crash courses, it’s a lifestyle change, I still eat a pizza takeaway or fish and chips but it’s all in moderation.”

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Covid Female Humans of HIIT Mental Health Sport

Amy Mackenzie

From a very young age I have always been incredibly active. Growing up I was like most normal kids, swimming lessons, bike rides and trips to the playground. But there was something not so normal compared to others. From the age of 4 I started acrobatic gymnastics. Like many other things it started as a hobby, training once or twice a week. However, as the years went on. It seemed that gymnastics was ‘my thing’, and I was destined to progress and succeed in the sport. By the age of 10 I was training up to 18 hours a week and competing internationally. By the age of 12 I was training 24 hours a week, I had represented my country and was now touring the country performing in the acrobatic troupe Spelbound. Of course this time of my life was such an incredible experience, and something I will forever be so proud of. But of course it comes with a hell of a lot of hard work.

I continued to train these huge hours, until the age of 16, continuing to perform and compete for my country. I decided to step away from the sport at the age of 16, as the demands of the training became too much. Of course by 16 my body was desperate to go through puberty so managing my weight, (which is something that was hugely important in a sport like acrobatics) was tough. I was training 20+ hours a week and running for 1-2 hours everyday to keep my weight down. I just needed a break.

When that break finally came, for a long time I refused to do any sort of exercise. I just wanted to sit and eat chocolate and I think for the first week I had retired that’s exactly what I did. It was great for a month or so, it was still a novelty to just sit and watch telly without knowing you had to get in a leotard later on. But as time went on I began to lose myself. I had no idea who I was without gymnastics. What else was I good at, I had no idea. I had never done anything other than gymnastics. About a year after retiring I got a personal trainer at my local gym. At first it was okay, I had a coach telling me what to do, which was something I was used to but I just didn’t feel as strong as I used to. It felt like some sort of punishment. Of course my body wasn’t in any sort of shape that it used to be when I was training, that was something I found incredibly difficult to cope with. Because of this I went into panic mode. I stopped exercising again because everything I did just didn’t feel good enough. I wasn’t seeing any physical changes or improvements so I felt there was no point.

Another year passes and finally my path crossed with the right people. Those incredible people being my current dance teachers. They coach me, support me and have taught me that I am talented and successful away from gymnastics. I now dance 11 hours a week and get to condition my body as well as perform without such high stakes.

March 2020, COVID-19 hit and the dance school had shut, I wasn’t working so it’s safe to say, my anxiety was through the roof at the thought of not doing what I knew I was good at, burning off the anxious energy dancing usually takes care of. So day 1 of Lockdown, I made it a goal of mine to workout everyday. I had managed to get hold of a spin bike so I was spinning everyday along with endless amounts of home workouts.

Now reflecting back on lockdown and where I am currently at, I have finally realised that for me exercise is so important to keep my mental health at bay. The physical changes my body have made are a bonus. Happiness is the most important and that is what exercise gives me. The fact I feel happy, makes me feel strong, not how many press ups I can do.”

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Humans of HIIT Male Running

Andy Raju

It was actually being accepted via ballot entry for the 2014 London Marathon that got me into running. What I learnt over time is that no runner started off by being a runner, it takes time and dedication. As a runner you have to expect both good days as well as off days as it takes time, but like with any physical activity, you must never give up! I had to be patient, and explore and try different running routes until I found a few that I enjoyed.

You will have some aches and pains but you must always respect the distance whether it is 5k or more. I therefore realised that all of these reasons are all of what can be applied for not only in running, or in any other activity or sport, but in life. Another lesson learnt is that running can be a great stress reliever, and helps to keep your mind at rest, as well as keeping your body in shape. After the marathon, I really got the bug, and felt encouraged to sign up for more races of varying distance such as 5k, 10k, and half marathons in order to build up my experience as well as my confidence in running, and setting goals. This included beating my best times and in general aiming to better myself.

My motto is ‘make running and walking a lifestyle’ it is not just a motto, I really do try and live by that. The way I see it, is that physical activity is a necessity in life, and being active is also about being healthy and feeling better. I have always tried to make physical activity a fun habit instead of a chore, which is what I tell others too who walk and run with me. I feel by doing this, I will continue enjoying this healthy habit and maintain and build upon.

Since running became a big part of my life, friends and neighbours kept asking me to help them get started. I completed a Leadership in Running Fitness Course (LiRF) back in May 2017, and became a UKA Run Leader. I have since started and have continued my local walking & running group ‘Run with Andy®` where running sessions take place twice a month, and walking sessions take place once a week from One Tree Hill Recreational Ground, Alperton, Wembley.

My aim is not only to get people out and active, but to also help make physical activity enjoyable and rewarding. I provide various trail walking routes and on my running sessions, combine the use of the outdoor gym located at various parks in Brent to keep it interesting.

Since I first started my group we have gained recognition from Brent Council, Won our 1st award in 2018 as RunTogether Group of The Year, (London Region) which is governed by England Athletics, and in 2019 we gained further recognition for both RunTogether Group of The Year as well as Run Leader of the Year! This journey grows from strength to strength!

I feel a sense of responsibility in my neighbourhood to help people reach their fitness goals whatever they may be, and to give encouragement and to maintain, in a fun and meaningful way.”

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Covid Female Humans of HIIT Mental Health Running School

Priscilla Lagally

“I was a very active child back then. I join every single sport in school because that makes me happy. My fitness journey started when I was 18 years old. I worked out every single day (not joking), I was obsessed with it. But it was not a healthy lifestyle for sure. I lost weight because I was barely eating. I skipped breakfast and only ate a small amount of food. It was crazy! So you can say my relationship with my fitness was a roller-coaster ride.

There’s times that I’m too lazy to workout because of work. My work is from 9 – 6 or I even work extra hours. It is hard to stay motivated because I’m too tired to exercise – all you want to do is eat and sleep – so that’s what I do and I stop exercising for a few years.

I started to exercise again when my friends asked me to join an Ultra Marathon. It was my first time joining so I had to prepare myself, so I started exercising again, going for a run after work and controlling my eating habits – that was 2017. Exercising helps me to relieve stress too, that’s why I love running.

My goals when it comes to fitness is that – I just want to stay healthy in a good way. It needs to be balanced. I still have a long way to go to achieve my goal but with a little bit of motivation and commitment – I will get there someday.

Honestly, my lifestyle right now is not organised because of this world pandemic. But I started to work out again because I know that is what I needed – working out will help me to be healthy and also it is good for my mental health – obviously gaining weight makes me feel bad about myself but I’m working on loving myself first. That is the most important thing to do.”

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Covid Female Humans of HIIT Pregnancy Running School

Kristin

“I was the kid who HATED gym class growing up. I did the minimum to get by. But I’ve always been a girl after a challenge.

When I was 21 I decided to start a Couch to 5k program. I ran some races and was sporadic, until 2011 when I decided I wanted to train for a half marathon. Like I said, I’m a girl after a challenge (so why not jump from a 5k to a half, right?). In 2012 I ran my first two, and only timed, half marathons, 5 months apart from each other.

After that, I was hooked and I continued to run intermittently. Around 2014, I started trying to conceive, which proved difficult, and in 2015 we turned to IVF, so I was required to stop running. It was worth the pause when my twin boys were born in 2016.

After that, running was put on the back burner, between becoming a mom and going through nurse practitioner school. I still enjoyed exercising, and thought it was a great way to release stress and have “me” time. I turned to home workouts instead, out of convenience.

Fast forward to 2020. My boys are older now. I’m a nurse practitioner.

We are in a pandemic. While I had continued to exercise, I found I missed running. It was one of the one safe things I could do during this scary, stressful time. So I bought some new running shoes and started running diligently again, 3-4 days a week.

Then I signed up for my first marathon. Remember those half marathons I ran? In 2012? Yeah, I hadn’t run that long or far in ages. My marathon is in April 2021. I’m hoping it’s live, but even if it isn’t, I am grateful for the training experience I have had so far. I’m officially halfway there, and I am amazed and proud of what my body can do.

I run and exercise for myself. It’s my time alone to just turn off my brain and move my body. But I also do it for my boys, who see me and tell me they want to exercise just like me. One of my sons has even gone on some runs with me, and I hope that will be something we can do together for years to come.

I have recently started a new phase in my journey: coaching. I want to share my love of running and exercise with people who may be a little nervous to begin, but have a “why” for getting started. It’s not always easy, but it will always be worth doing, and nothing makes me happier than cheering people on and helping them reach their goals.”

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Uncategorized

Martin Gittins

“I have always done exercise. From the age of 5 I have played football 3 to 4 times a week. At school, up the local park with friends and with a local football team. At the age of 14 I became a football referee (we aren’t all that bad) to give back and earn some extra money.

When I was 21, I suffered a cartilage injury to my knee that meant I had to step away from playing. The lack of exercise meant I had my first brushes with mental illness, although I didn’t know it at the time. The reduced outlet and coping strategy meant my normal routines were gone.

To ensure I kept a routine and could exercise, I fell back on Refereeing and running gaining promotion through refereeing to semi-professional leagues. Work, refereeing and life balance pressures and stresses forced me to step away from refereeing, again another routine gone.

I am now rebuilding my routines around running.

My running routines give me a firm foundation to build on. Minimum 3km runs 3 times a week, road or trail. For me it is more important to get out and run.

Running has given me an outlet for my stresses, for my anxieties or worries. Running has given me so many coping strategies and has taught me so much that I have used through this year of unprecedented change and with unprecedented challenges to my mental health.

I am taking this year like when running a 10k or half gets tough. Run a mile I am in, focus on this mile not the remaining distance. Take it mile by mile or day by day. Nothing more nothing less.”

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Humans of HIIT Male Running

Mickael Boulogne

“Two years ago I decided to get serious about sports. After multiple health problems, exertional asthma, one leg smaller than the other is betting on running a marathon.

A 42 km course seems unthinkable for many people but not for me. The beginning is hard and it always is, but when you want it you can and everyone must have these sentences in mind.

1: Even go for a run if it’s only a mile. 2: Continue without giving up, after a month the progress is dazzling. 3: Prepare a plan for a 5km or a 10km 4: Continue training and prepare the future 42km plan which takes at least 12 weeks. 5: The important thing is to have fun and realize the efforts made and tell yourself that you will always be better than someone who does nothing!

Believe in yourself! Believe in your potential! If you want to follow my training and complete his 42km together: mb_running62

Good luck everyone”

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Female Humans of HIIT Running

Sarah Sorbek

“Never take your health for granted.

It can disappear in an instant. I grew up as an athlete – competitive gymnastics followed by competitive swimming. I then got into racing triathlons in 2003 at age 19. Sadly in the beginning of 2004 my health started declining very quickly, and for 4 years I had no answers. Finally in 2008 I was diagnosed with endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, and eventually adenomyosis.

I had to take 10 years off from sports of any kind, and I was barely able to be active at all – some days even walking was a huge challenge. I fought hard for 10 years to get my health and quality of life back, and I looked forward to racing again! I refused to let illness take over my life permanently.

I’ve happily been back to training and racing since late 2013, and loving every minute! I’ve also started trail running which I love, and I’ve done a half marathon and will be doing my second on Christmas Day! Friends and family ask me why I push my body so hard, and my answer is always, because for 10 years I couldn’t.

I will keep pushing as long as I can, to prove to myself I’m still capable.”

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Female Humans of HIIT School Weight Loss Workouts Classes

Bethany Rose

“Since as a young girl I guess I had always been quite active and when I got into middle school I joined up to the cross country group and loved it! I joined army cadets at 13 and the discipline really helped me to be better and more efficient in deciding what I wanted to do with my life in the future, I left at 16 and then exercise went down hill and gained a little weight when college started.

Exercise means life to me and really saved me from my own depression, I had found Bodypump from LesMills at my local gym and it completely changed my perspective on ending everything right there and then and kept me going. After feeling the drive and motivation from the group exercise class it just grew and grew and grew and now I’m a qualified Bodypump instructor myself and run my own HIIT bootcamps 2-3 times a week and learning to become a holistic nutrition advisor. Before all this I had just left London, I was a smoker, never drank, found comfort in food everyday and started becoming even more aware of the fact that I had anxiety all my life. I wasn’t happy and just felt so sorry for myself and enough was enough. Exercise is my way of channeling my insecurities of being different from the rest, to feel strong, to stay focused and committed but to also live my life, to feel and be better than myself, to see the bigger picture and to know that if I feel sad, worried or even having an attack that exercise is my number 1 pillar.

When SAS who dares wins came around I was totally hooked and my passion for exercise got even bigger and soon enough I got myself onto Ant Middletons mind over muscle day camps and got to meet him myself. I still wear the wrist band we all got given from that day and wear it everyday to remind myself that I can do anything I put my mind to and to seal the deal even more… I got it tattooed. HIIT training and Bodypump is the love of my life and I can’t see myself quitting any day soon.”