Categories
Gym Training Humans of HIIT Injury Male Mental Health Running School Sport Weight Loss

Harry Millard

“Going to boarding school, rugby was a huge part of our daily life. I was training and playing during the week for school and then for the local club at the weekend. Every evening we were in the school gym, trying to get bigger and stronger – it was about as stereotypical as you can imagine (stringer vests and all)! Unfortunately being active all the time was masking the disordered eating habits I had picked up. When I was sidelined with a serious head injury the habits only got worse, and I dealt with my depression by going to the shop every day and taking food back to my room to binge – I stopped working out and, at my worst, I was over 130kg (20.5 stone) and miserable. I started my fitness Instagram to give myself some accountability and to document my journey with others – and it gave me a new drive to continue to improve. I fell back in love with the gym and with rugby – I started my career and was really in a good place. Then I was hit with another serious injury, this time a broken ankle, and I landed squarely back on square one. I continue to document my up-and-down journey back from that setback, and have found passion in being active again – including signing up for the Great South Run later this year! Whilst rugby remains a huge part of my life and remains a key motivation behind improving my physical ability, I also train for health and happiness that I know it brings.”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

Categories
Family Female Humans of HIIT Injury Mental Health Personal Trainers Pregnancy Sport University

Sue Tetley

“My relationship with sport and exercise has been rather mixed throughout my life. I was never particularly sporty as a child. I enjoyed sprinting and doing the long jump. I went to school in the 80’s to mid 90’s and still remember very clearly waiting to be picked for teams. I was generally picked somewhere in the middle or towards the end. Never a good thing for a child’s self-esteem. 

As a teenager, I really got into racket sports, badminton initially then squash.  I had a few friends  who were at a similar level and would enjoy playing weekly. At the age of 18 I went to Loughborough University to study psychology. I was aware this was a very sporty university, but that wasn’t really a consideration when I went there. The level of even the inter-mural hall sports was very high.  It did put me off trying much sport there. I chose to do karate as it was something I could start with as a beginner and work up the grades. I enjoyed this and did it for a few years. Twenty odd years on, I wish I had made more of the available facilities. 

Following university, I started to dabble in running and did my first race for life. Prior to that, I don’t think I’d ever run 5K before. A few years later, I did my first half marathon in Nottingham where I was living at the time. This was a huge achievement for me. It was great that lots of my friends did the event as well. Throughout my 20’s and 30’s I was always rather inconsistent with exercise, training for an event and then not doing much afterwards. I was definitely a ‘Yo Yo’ exerciser.

In my mid 30’s exercise took on a different and more cathartic role and really helped me with my mental well-being as well as physical well-being whilst going through multiple rounds of IVF.  After each failed attempt, I would enter a running event or cycling event. After I had decided to stop treatment and choose to adopt instead, I threw myself into a more consistent pattern of exercise.

Around 4 years ago a friend of mine spent about 6 months trying to persuade me to join the local triathlon club.  Initially I thought I wasn’t good enough at any of the disciplines, however, soon realised that this didn’t matter at all.  I was getting injured just running. I started PT sessions and soon realised I needed to do loads more strength and conditioning to prevent injury. Joining TRISudbury was a real turning point for me.  I had never been part of a club before and had always exercised on my own. I really started to enjoy training with groups and have made some great friends.

I have now done many triathlons and taken on new challenges each year.  I also discovered my love of swimming in open water and last summer did a 2 mile swim in the Serpentine. I really love challenging myself. I’m never going to be the fastest, however, I am mentally tough and won’t give up on my goals. My next challenge will be a half ironman distance triathlon. In addition to this, I also became the Welfare Officer for the club for 2 years. I am now one of the club’s Mental Health Champions. At the AGM earlier this year, I was delighted this year to be given the female Grindstone award and became a This Girl Can Ambassador for Suffolk as well.

I am nearly 43 and I totally believe that if you work hard and never give up on your goals you can achieve anything. It’s so important to me to be a good role model for my little girl. I am fitter now than I ever have been and would say to anyone to never let anyone tell you that you cannot achieve something!”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

Categories
Female Humans of HIIT Mental Health Physical Impairment

Poppy May

“I was an active person doing photoshoots almost everyday. Travelling to different locations and getting on the floor for angles of shots.

In April 2018 i woke up with back pain and then by the end of the week I couldn’t stand or move my legs. It was terrifying . A few months later I was diagnosed with a neurological disorder where my brain doesn’t communicate with my body. I have been unable to feel or move my legs since April 2018. I have a weak upper body some days and I also experience non epileptic seizures that can last hours! 

Since becoming a wheelchair user I have lost loads of my self confidence and comfort ate every day . A few months ago my mental health was at the worst and I was almost sectioned . I turned to exercise to make me feel good. Starting out from 1 sit up to 20 sit ups whilst holding a 6 kilo kettlebell. You could say exercise saved my life.”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

Categories
Humans of HIIT Male Mental Health Physical Impairment Running

James Gasson

“After spending most of my adult life drinking and smoking a lot and generally not being very active bar a bit of football here and there, I for some strange reason felt I could run the London marathon 2020 and decided to apply through a charity place.

I chose to apply for Mind the mental health charity, this was a charity very close to my heart having been through my own mental health struggles in recent years. Anyway what I believed wouldn’t happen did in fact happen and I was accepted. Despite the shock of actually getting a place I started out my running in mid October 2019 and to be honest despite a few bumps in the road, I’ve never looked back.

The change I’ve felt since running physically and mentally has been amazing, and although before I actually hated running I now have a new found love for it and even when I finally make it over that finish line I’m not going to stop running and will be doing more marathons, I would like to complete the Abbott world marathon majors, but for now I will be taking it 1 marathon at a time.”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!