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Female Humans of HIIT Personal Trainers Weight Loss

Hannah Rehel

I was that girl that walked by a mirror and turned her head away because she would cry every time she saw herself. One day I got fed up with crying and feeling sorry for myself so I started working out with these little home guides from online and counting my calories. The weight started to melt off although counting calories wasn’t sustainable and the workout guides were becoming easier by the day. This is when I found Beachbody! It was a life change. It’s like the Netflix of fitness and it also showed me how to establish a healthy balanced diet. When I use the word diet I do not mean I’m on a diet. I mean diet as in what I eat. I used to associate the word diet with restrictive and terrible habits now I see it as fuel for my body. If I have any advice for anyone wanting to start their fitness journey here’s some tips:

1) ditch the scale and start taking pictures and measurements because the scale LIES

2) diet is knowing what to eat and not what you cannot eat

3) move that beautiful body of yours for at least 30 minutes a day! If you can’t workout that’s fine to just go for a walk!

4) trust the process because it’s so worth it in the end!

I have lost over 20 pounds of fat and definitely gained lots of muscles! We need to realize that muscle weighs more than fat so that’s why I say the scale lies because it’s not taking into account how much heavier muscle is compared to fat 🙂

I’m now a coach for Beachbody and have an Instagram page – @hann__24. I believe in creating healthy habits and moving our bodies to ensure a happy healthy lifestyle!

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Elaine Smith

I am old now. I have struggled with mental health all my life due to an unhappy childhood. I was anorexic at 15 and experienced suicidal thoughts from 13. I had issues with my body image. 

Exercise wasn’t big when I was young and my adoptive parents weren’t interested. I was bullied at school so only took up sports in my twenties, netball, hockey and yoga. I enjoyed the buzz of exercise and the camaraderie of team sport. I found I was good at sport. I brought my children up to be sporty and my husband was mad about cricket and football. I taught full time, hiding my mental health problems and found any exercise gave me a release from negative thoughts and made me feel positive and able to carry on. I first joined a gym and did exercise classes about 25 years ago. I have tried everything from kick boxing, running and aerobics and they all helped with me having a positive mindset and feeling better about myself. I am now used to HIIT, gym workouts, walking, jogging and now have Personal Trainers as well. The Townsend Twins train me. 

I was finally diagnosed with all my mental illnesses in May 2019 but have had breakdowns since 2001. I have been on medication since 1996. 

I started to increase my exercise regime after my diagnosis. Once I could start cutting back on medication I was able to exercise more. I find getting my heart pumping from HIIT classes gives my mood a huge lift and makes life bearable. I do Metafit and am proud I can do burpees. I also have a mini trampoline. During lockdown exercise has been my lifeline. Without exercise I wouldn’t still be here. Exercise is a huge part of my life and I work out several times a day everyday. I started posting on Instagram in the summer showing how exercise helps me manage my mental health. I am not great at some things but none of my photos are doctored and I post honestly. I now have over 800 followers.

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Tamara Olaniyan

 

“I had a relationship with fitness but it was sporadic. I took fitness seriously in spurts: when I needed to enlist in the military. Before that, I ran track in high school but not seriously. When I was discharged, my health took a nose-dive. I did not feel good about myself and when things didn’t go well, I turned to food. Food was my very best friend. I joined a gym because I didn’t like how I look and how tight my clothes fit. The bigger I bought my clothes, the more I was buying bigger clothes since I outgrew my clothes within months. At my heaviest, I was 210 pounds. 

Getting stuck with a year of personal training was the “best”, overlooked mistake I could have made. Two awesome women personal trainers assisted me on my journey. I learned the same way I made time to engage in other activities, I would have to learn to schedule and prioritize fitness. When I started putting my exercise workouts on my calendar, I became more accountable and made less excuses for working out. Even now with gyms closed, I use the weights in my house, download a fitness app on the phone, and get my workout in. Either way, 6 days a week for at least 45 minutes, I am going to engage in some type of HITT, strength training, or cardio. I give myself one day of active recovery and rest. For fun, I like to run races. I see it all as a great way to help with my depression and anxiety and to allow myself “me time” when I will not allow myself to be disturbed. I allow myself to be selfish during my workout times. 

What has really inspired me is seeing other women who have embraced weight training, like my former personal trainers. I always thought if women lifted heavy weights, they would look like “She-Hulk”. I learned later it’s not the case. My hat is always off when I see other women doing their thing in fitness, especially women of color. It’s a great feeling and maybe it will open the door for others to put health and fitness in the top 5.”

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Anisha Gangotra

“By day I work within the NHS and by night I’m an Inclusive Dance and Zumba Instructor.

Growing up, I was super active. I loved playing sports. Hockey was my main sport and I started off by pulling around an old sawn-off hockey stick of my dad’s from when I could just about walk. I love to dance too and I’ve tried hip hop and Bollywood dancing over the years.

My life changed in 2008 at 24 years old – I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC), a chronic auto-immune condition where my immune system attacks my bowels. Symptoms include blood loss, diarrhoea, bowel urgency, pain and fatigue. My most debilitating symptom is fatigue, which has affected how I can stay active.

Then in 2011, I was the victim of a traumatic, high-speed car accident. Overnight, my ability to exercise was taken away. I struggled to get out of bed by myself and I literally had to take everything one step at a time. I suffered with physical injuries as well as PTSD, depression and anxiety, which took years to recover from.

These personal challenges led me to becoming an Inclusive Dance and Zumba instructor. I wanted to provide a safe space for all, including those with disabilities, long-term conditions and mental health issues to enjoy the physical and mental benefits of dance. It’s also provided a space to have an open dialogue about the issues we’re facing and share our personal challenges. That in itself, has been truly powerful.

Being active from a young age taught me many skills which I‘ve used throughout my life and stood me in good stead to face these challenges. I’ve had to adapt and think outside of the box to find what works for me.”

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Claire Jones

 

“I have always enjoyed sport although I wasn’t the best at typical school sports like netball and hockey. I gave them a go but was never good enough to make the teams. I always wanted to do the typical boys sports.. football, cricket. I’ve always loved running and cross country and did that through my teens.

At uni I met a couple of girls who played football. I joined the women’s football team and loved it. After uni I carried on playing football and got my coaching badges. I kept running and going to the gym to keep fit.

After I had my daughter I gave up coaching as it took up too much time with a young family. I still tried to keep fit by running and going to the gym. I then started to suffer with a bowel condition..

In 2012 I was rushed to hospital and diagnosed with chronic ulcerative colitis. My only form of treatment was to have my bowel removed. I was given a permanent ileostomy which saved my life. As I recovered I wanted to get fit again.. I set myself targets.. events or distances I wanted to achieve, whether it was a distance or a strength goal. I’m now fitter and stronger then ever. My ileostomy has given me life.. I am determined to live every minute. I go to the gym, have run 2 half marathons, regularly run 5 and 10ks, I have done a duathlon and I cycle.

Keeping fit and active is a privilege, it helps me feel better and allows me to spend time with my daughter when we are out running or cycling together!”

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Gemma Davis

Having spent the majority of my 20s overweight and unfit and I decided I didn’t want to spend my 30s the same way.

I wasn’t really sure where to start with getting fitter. Initially I started with a bit of running and a friend suggested a personal trainer – David Wells (@davidjameswellspt). Working with Dave I’m using equipment and doing exercises I never would have found on my own.

Importantly, no matter what mood I turn up to train in I always leave feeling like I can take on the world! I’ve loved seeing what my body can do and learning about what I need to best fuel it.

But the biggest change is my confidence. As someone who has always struggled with their body image the thought of running, in public, in shorts (!) would have terrified me 6 months ago.

Being fit and healthy is such a big part of my life now. I can run 5k and do push ups. Both things I never thought I’d be able to do. I can’t wait to see what is next on my fitness journey and what else my body can accomplish!

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Sue Tetley

“My relationship with sport and exercise has been rather mixed throughout my life. I was never particularly sporty as a child. I enjoyed sprinting and doing the long jump. I went to school in the 80’s to mid 90’s and still remember very clearly waiting to be picked for teams. I was generally picked somewhere in the middle or towards the end. Never a good thing for a child’s self-esteem. 

As a teenager, I really got into racket sports, badminton initially then squash.  I had a few friends  who were at a similar level and would enjoy playing weekly. At the age of 18 I went to Loughborough University to study psychology. I was aware this was a very sporty university, but that wasn’t really a consideration when I went there. The level of even the inter-mural hall sports was very high.  It did put me off trying much sport there. I chose to do karate as it was something I could start with as a beginner and work up the grades. I enjoyed this and did it for a few years. Twenty odd years on, I wish I had made more of the available facilities. 

Following university, I started to dabble in running and did my first race for life. Prior to that, I don’t think I’d ever run 5K before. A few years later, I did my first half marathon in Nottingham where I was living at the time. This was a huge achievement for me. It was great that lots of my friends did the event as well. Throughout my 20’s and 30’s I was always rather inconsistent with exercise, training for an event and then not doing much afterwards. I was definitely a ‘Yo Yo’ exerciser.

In my mid 30’s exercise took on a different and more cathartic role and really helped me with my mental well-being as well as physical well-being whilst going through multiple rounds of IVF.  After each failed attempt, I would enter a running event or cycling event. After I had decided to stop treatment and choose to adopt instead, I threw myself into a more consistent pattern of exercise.

Around 4 years ago a friend of mine spent about 6 months trying to persuade me to join the local triathlon club.  Initially I thought I wasn’t good enough at any of the disciplines, however, soon realised that this didn’t matter at all.  I was getting injured just running. I started PT sessions and soon realised I needed to do loads more strength and conditioning to prevent injury. Joining TRISudbury was a real turning point for me.  I had never been part of a club before and had always exercised on my own. I really started to enjoy training with groups and have made some great friends.

I have now done many triathlons and taken on new challenges each year.  I also discovered my love of swimming in open water and last summer did a 2 mile swim in the Serpentine. I really love challenging myself. I’m never going to be the fastest, however, I am mentally tough and won’t give up on my goals. My next challenge will be a half ironman distance triathlon. In addition to this, I also became the Welfare Officer for the club for 2 years. I am now one of the club’s Mental Health Champions. At the AGM earlier this year, I was delighted this year to be given the female Grindstone award and became a This Girl Can Ambassador for Suffolk as well.

I am nearly 43 and I totally believe that if you work hard and never give up on your goals you can achieve anything. It’s so important to me to be a good role model for my little girl. I am fitter now than I ever have been and would say to anyone to never let anyone tell you that you cannot achieve something!”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

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Tom Middlebrook

“Taking part in physical activity has always been something I have enjoyed; a kick about in the park with friends, playing tennis, outdoor adventure activities. Whatever it is, I’m always up for getting involved. However, life changes. The things we once had time for have become lost, and the challenge of a work-life balance takes centre stage.

As a young, working adult the time I had for health and fitness seemingly drifted away. After a long day at work the evenings became dedicated to doing nothing – there seemed to be no time for anything else. Finish work, commute home, make dinner, eat dinner, go to bed. Where was the time for anything else? And to be honest, in my early twenties I didn’t really care! I could eat and drink as much as wanted with little or no effect on my physical and mental wellbeing. Life was actually pretty easy.

But then came the late twenties…

It turns out you can’t eat and drink as much as you like and do no exercise! Not only does your physical appearance change, a feeling of unhealthiness kicks in. I became lethargic and unmotivated and good night’s sleep was hard to come by! And on top of this, confidence plummeted. It was time to make a change.

I needed to make time for health and fitness. Stop making poor excuses about there not being enough hours in the day – find them! This won’t be the same for everyone, but for me, I needed to make the most of the mornings. Stop rolling out of bed with barely enough time to get to work; start getting up earlier and do some exercise. Finding the motivation to achieve this was tough, but I succeeded by signing up to my local gym and paying for PT sessions. I honestly could not have done it alone. Yes, PT might be expensive, but it is 100% worth it!”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

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Hannah Robinson

“As a child I only really did sport to stop putting on weight, I was a tennis and swimming coach but more because kids are meant to get involved in these hobbies, not because I enjoyed it. Fitness wasn’t really my thing despite growing up in a family that walked marathons, ran half’s,  captained cricket teams and trained to become a PT.

Skip to uni and I was more interested in clubbing and cheesy chips then keeping fit and I put on an extra layer of chub. Post uni/working life I got a PT, joined a gym and due to some things that changed my life I turned to running a lot more. With an events job changing my routine daily, it is hard to keep it up when deliveries of food and wine are plentiful. Pre lockdown I was due to go to the Philippines, I was very much on the London Barry’s/1Rebel hype, running on treadmills in the pitch black until I was nearly sick.

Then came lockdown, a cancelled holiday & mums stockpiling of Easter eggs, all the effort I had put into classes was gone. I started running but got bored of my routes and when my pal mentioned these classes I thought why not. I’m isolating at my family home and asked my mum if she was up for joining. 17 workouts later and we are both tuning in where we can. We both feel fitter then ever, I just hope I can keep it up when I start working and commuting again, it keeps me motivated and it’s great to see others.”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

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Amber Jerome

When I was 17 years old, I had a difficult decision to make. Do I give up dance and go study law at University or try to make a career out of teaching dance? I chose not to go to university, as dancing was all I ever knew and loved. So, when I fell out of love with dance it was tough.

But one door closes and another opens, and I started working on a zero-hour contract at a gym getting involved in more and more projects and events. Before I knew it, I had completed my level 2 fitness instructor course and was teaching a regular dance fitness class. I got a full-time job and was really happy making a career in the fitness industry. I had never thought about teaching fitness as a career but here I was, and I loved it.

Since then I’ve completed my level 3 PT course, I teach regular classes and I train my lovely clients. Exercise is not only an element of my job but is a great way for me to escape from the real world. I’m a bit of an over thinker and find other than sleep, exercise is the only thing that can take my mind off things. My life literally evolves around fitness, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!