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Female Humans of HIIT Physical Impairment Running Sport

Nadine Doutre

“From a young age, Tennis was my thing! From the age of 4, I would play tennis a few times a week for fun, then gradually as I became older, I was training up to 4-5 hours a day, 6 days a week. I would train on and off court and compete too. My mindset from a young age was to improve technique, to be fitter, to be faster, keep improving as you could always be better! Physical exercise then was only to improve my tennis.

At the age of 19 I stopped playing tennis full time and went into education, I went to college, then onto University and then into full time work. Priorities changed for me and physical activity was not my top priority, but I would still try to exercise as much as I could. I found that I was now exercising for a different reason, to keep my weight down, to feel better, to look better. I still enjoyed playing tennis, I would run, go to the gym and attend fitness classes. In 2018, when I turned 30 I decided to run the Brighton Marathon to prove to myself that I could still physically challenge myself, which was a real achievement for me alongside raising money for MIND.

In Nov 2018 I was diagnosed with Pleurisy, which has been off and on affecting me up until the lockdown. This is inflammation of the Pleura (lining of the lung) which can cause a lot of pain when breathing when inflamed. As a result, the majority of the time I was unable to do any exercise that put any pressure on my lungs.

I have only just been able to start exercising regularly again within the last 3 weeks. Exercising from home at the moment is great for me as I can work at my own pace and do what I can. My chest is feeling good at the moment and I have even started going out for some short runs again too. 

It has been tough starting back, I have to be patient and know my limits of what I can do, but i’m loving it! Being able to exercise is not something I will ever take for granted!”

 

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Humans of HIIT Male Mental Health Physical Impairment Running

James Gasson

“After spending most of my adult life drinking and smoking a lot and generally not being very active bar a bit of football here and there, I for some strange reason felt I could run the London marathon 2020 and decided to apply through a charity place.

I chose to apply for Mind the mental health charity, this was a charity very close to my heart having been through my own mental health struggles in recent years. Anyway what I believed wouldn’t happen did in fact happen and I was accepted. Despite the shock of actually getting a place I started out my running in mid October 2019 and to be honest despite a few bumps in the road, I’ve never looked back.

The change I’ve felt since running physically and mentally has been amazing, and although before I actually hated running I now have a new found love for it and even when I finally make it over that finish line I’m not going to stop running and will be doing more marathons, I would like to complete the Abbott world marathon majors, but for now I will be taking it 1 marathon at a time.”

 

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Gym Training Humans of HIIT Male Physical Impairment Sport University

Digby Hayden

My relationship with sport had a rocky start to say the least; the day after I learned to run, I fell and broke my toe- somewhat foreshadowing later events. I started off with minis rugby at age 6, and also had been doing casual swimming lessons.

Unfortunately when I was younger; I was more interested in other things than sport, and quit rugby when I was 10, but kept on with the swimming, which I am very glad my parents forced me to do! As I matured both physically and mentally, my swimming grew with it; I started winning our club galas, and my times were getting fairly impressive for a 16 year old, which took me up to county level, and even some podiums. But injury struck me again. Whilst climbing over a fence to fetch a rugby ball, I tore my ACL, which took me a good year to recover from fully. I could still swim, but my times and stamina both took a nosedive in quality. And by the time I recovered, my A levels were just around the corner, so the 5 training sessions a week were no longer possible, so this is when I decided to rejoin my local rugby club.

This time, I truly fell in love with the game, especially the social aspect, which then translated into my university life. Joining the rugby club at university was incredible, I got to know so many people, exercised a lot, and got heavily involved not just by captaining a team for a year, but also further up in sport at university. Here, I was voted into the executive committee two years running, and this really grew my passion for sport, and how it’s more than just exercise, but a release of stress and also the ability to socialise.

Now, I continue to play rugby at home, alongside the odd swimming session. Unfortunately, I seem to have recently aggravated my old ACL injury but once again, the rehab is giving me something to aim for by the time we are released!

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

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Female Gym Training Humans of HIIT Physical Impairment Workouts Classes

Naomi Kennett

Age 8 I was diagnosed with idiopathic scoliosis, I wore a back brace 23 hours a day until I was 15 years old. I couldn’t swim anymore, play sports, and even PE was off the cards due to discomfort and having to be out of the brace to do it. I was inactive, and pretty fed up. Age 15 I had my spine rodded with titanium. 

I remained pretty inactive, afraid to do sports in case of injury, I watched my friends play football and rugby but always knew i wouldn’t ever be able to do it. Then at the age of 25 I went to a gym with my mate for the first time, I picked up a weight and I never looked back.

I had found something I could progress in. A personal journey, I can never be “great” and lift kilos and kilos above my body weight but I can make my own goals, challenge myself and achieve them and that’s all that matters. I make my own agenda and I do things on my terms. 

5 years on, and until lockdown I was training every day, if not twice a day. I was lucky enough to have my last job at Portsmouth uni where I really embraced my fitness journey and also made good friends and learnt so many skills. Now in a GP surgery I plan to continue my training when I can and really make some goals to smash in the future. 

The most important part of my fitness journey was learning I CAN do things, and I can be part of a family while still focussing on what I am able to do within my own limits. Never underestimate the power of the body. For someone with a fully rodded back I do ok….I focus on form and getting it right, keeping myself within the limits my back can take and enjoying the journey along the way!”

 

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Female Humans of HIIT Personal Trainers Physical Impairment Running School Sport University

Dani Clamp

“At secondary school P.E. was my favourite lesson, even by the age of 14 when 80% of the other girls were getting out of it every week claiming they had “period pains” I still loved it (this was also when I realised I got on a lot better with guys)! I started playing club netball at the age of 10 and continued until I went to University at 19.

Despite studying a completely non-related subject, I threw myself into everything sport related. In my second year I took on an organisational committee role in the netball club, in my third year I was Captain, then during my Masters I continued as captain and also got elected as the University sports Chairwoman.

When I finished my Masters degree I moved back in with my parents and that’s when I hit a low point. I have always been a very positive yet realistic individual, however being stuck in a house on my own applying for jobs all day (and getting rejected from most) got to me; both mentally and physically. I was boredom eating so much and couldn’t afford to join a gym being unemployed. I began noticing some fat gain and having not played netball for 6 months I was missing it; so decided to join a new club. I began playing for the team and it was the only thing I looked forward to each week. 4 weeks in, I fell on my ankle during a game and tore my anterior ankle ligament. Complete tear. This was in October 2019.

It is now April 2020 and I have only just managed a 5km run in less than 32 minutes. My mental health plummeted, which I didn’t really tell anybody about. I was feeling down every day, I was irritable constantly and snapping at my family for the tiniest things. Luckily, a good friend of mine is very knowledgeable in the world of strength and conditioning and rehab and began helping me on my road to recovery.  The more my ankle recovered and the more active I got, the happier I became. The happier I became, the more my life seemed like it was falling into place, with both work and relationships.”

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!

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Humans of HIIT Male Physical Impairment Running Sport Weight Loss Workouts Classes

Jon Wheatley

I’ve always been a pretty fit and healthy person; very active and not one to sit inside and watch Netflix on a day off. Technically I am what old fashioned scales (like BMIs) would call overweight, but I’m healthy and very comfortable. In 2018 I completed my first marathon (narrowly missing out on a sub 4-hour finish by 3 minutes, despite never training passed 13 miles).  I’ve always stayed fit through football, going for runs after work, longboarding, cycling, swimming, walking/hiking, basically anything other than the gym. 

Unfortunately, I’ve spent the last 6 months recovering from ACL and cartilage damage in my right knee, and about 80% of my exercise and physical activity is highly impacting on this.  It’s been a tough recovery; having gone from it taking me 5-10 seconds for my brain to process actions involving the joint to straightening my leg, walking, cycling and swimming.  I’m still in a position that I may need surgery, but that won’t be known until once a certain C word has passed!   

The downside of this injury is that now I definitely am overweight!  I weighed myself recently and wasn’t surprised to see that I have put on over a stone since this occurred!  It has however given me the motivation to correct this; furloughing me has had some benefits!  I am really enjoying exploring alternative exercises to what I have traditionally taken part in.  I have the time to test out workout routines and pilates/stretching and can still enjoy my long cycles.  I have been following my friend’s HIIT workouts that he leads on Zoom and enjoying exercising with others able to see and support me. I am learning what I can and can’t do and what I am feeling the benefit from.  I must be cautious of my knee and will adapt or replace exercises if required.  I’m beginning to feel healthier already and confident in my strength and knee at the moment, and very motivated and determined to use my time off from work to return to a healthier weight.

 

Thank you from the Humans of HIIT community for sharing your story!