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Humans of HIIT Male Running

Andy Raju

It was actually being accepted via ballot entry for the 2014 London Marathon that got me into running. What I learnt over time is that no runner started off by being a runner, it takes time and dedication. As a runner you have to expect both good days as well as off days as it takes time, but like with any physical activity, you must never give up! I had to be patient, and explore and try different running routes until I found a few that I enjoyed.

You will have some aches and pains but you must always respect the distance whether it is 5k or more. I therefore realised that all of these reasons are all of what can be applied for not only in running, or in any other activity or sport, but in life. Another lesson learnt is that running can be a great stress reliever, and helps to keep your mind at rest, as well as keeping your body in shape. After the marathon, I really got the bug, and felt encouraged to sign up for more races of varying distance such as 5k, 10k, and half marathons in order to build up my experience as well as my confidence in running, and setting goals. This included beating my best times and in general aiming to better myself.

My motto is ‘make running and walking a lifestyle’ it is not just a motto, I really do try and live by that. The way I see it, is that physical activity is a necessity in life, and being active is also about being healthy and feeling better. I have always tried to make physical activity a fun habit instead of a chore, which is what I tell others too who walk and run with me. I feel by doing this, I will continue enjoying this healthy habit and maintain and build upon.

Since running became a big part of my life, friends and neighbours kept asking me to help them get started. I completed a Leadership in Running Fitness Course (LiRF) back in May 2017, and became a UKA Run Leader. I have since started and have continued my local walking & running group ‘Run with Andy®` where running sessions take place twice a month, and walking sessions take place once a week from One Tree Hill Recreational Ground, Alperton, Wembley.

My aim is not only to get people out and active, but to also help make physical activity enjoyable and rewarding. I provide various trail walking routes and on my running sessions, combine the use of the outdoor gym located at various parks in Brent to keep it interesting.

Since I first started my group we have gained recognition from Brent Council, Won our 1st award in 2018 as RunTogether Group of The Year, (London Region) which is governed by England Athletics, and in 2019 we gained further recognition for both RunTogether Group of The Year as well as Run Leader of the Year! This journey grows from strength to strength!

I feel a sense of responsibility in my neighbourhood to help people reach their fitness goals whatever they may be, and to give encouragement and to maintain, in a fun and meaningful way.”

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Covid Female Humans of HIIT Mental Health Running School

Priscilla Lagally

“I was a very active child back then. I join every single sport in school because that makes me happy. My fitness journey started when I was 18 years old. I worked out every single day (not joking), I was obsessed with it. But it was not a healthy lifestyle for sure. I lost weight because I was barely eating. I skipped breakfast and only ate a small amount of food. It was crazy! So you can say my relationship with my fitness was a roller-coaster ride.

There’s times that I’m too lazy to workout because of work. My work is from 9 – 6 or I even work extra hours. It is hard to stay motivated because I’m too tired to exercise – all you want to do is eat and sleep – so that’s what I do and I stop exercising for a few years.

I started to exercise again when my friends asked me to join an Ultra Marathon. It was my first time joining so I had to prepare myself, so I started exercising again, going for a run after work and controlling my eating habits – that was 2017. Exercising helps me to relieve stress too, that’s why I love running.

My goals when it comes to fitness is that – I just want to stay healthy in a good way. It needs to be balanced. I still have a long way to go to achieve my goal but with a little bit of motivation and commitment – I will get there someday.

Honestly, my lifestyle right now is not organised because of this world pandemic. But I started to work out again because I know that is what I needed – working out will help me to be healthy and also it is good for my mental health – obviously gaining weight makes me feel bad about myself but I’m working on loving myself first. That is the most important thing to do.”

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Covid Female Humans of HIIT Pregnancy Running School

Kristin

“I was the kid who HATED gym class growing up. I did the minimum to get by. But I’ve always been a girl after a challenge.

When I was 21 I decided to start a Couch to 5k program. I ran some races and was sporadic, until 2011 when I decided I wanted to train for a half marathon. Like I said, I’m a girl after a challenge (so why not jump from a 5k to a half, right?). In 2012 I ran my first two, and only timed, half marathons, 5 months apart from each other.

After that, I was hooked and I continued to run intermittently. Around 2014, I started trying to conceive, which proved difficult, and in 2015 we turned to IVF, so I was required to stop running. It was worth the pause when my twin boys were born in 2016.

After that, running was put on the back burner, between becoming a mom and going through nurse practitioner school. I still enjoyed exercising, and thought it was a great way to release stress and have “me” time. I turned to home workouts instead, out of convenience.

Fast forward to 2020. My boys are older now. I’m a nurse practitioner.

We are in a pandemic. While I had continued to exercise, I found I missed running. It was one of the one safe things I could do during this scary, stressful time. So I bought some new running shoes and started running diligently again, 3-4 days a week.

Then I signed up for my first marathon. Remember those half marathons I ran? In 2012? Yeah, I hadn’t run that long or far in ages. My marathon is in April 2021. I’m hoping it’s live, but even if it isn’t, I am grateful for the training experience I have had so far. I’m officially halfway there, and I am amazed and proud of what my body can do.

I run and exercise for myself. It’s my time alone to just turn off my brain and move my body. But I also do it for my boys, who see me and tell me they want to exercise just like me. One of my sons has even gone on some runs with me, and I hope that will be something we can do together for years to come.

I have recently started a new phase in my journey: coaching. I want to share my love of running and exercise with people who may be a little nervous to begin, but have a “why” for getting started. It’s not always easy, but it will always be worth doing, and nothing makes me happier than cheering people on and helping them reach their goals.”

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Humans of HIIT Male Running

Mickael Boulogne

“Two years ago I decided to get serious about sports. After multiple health problems, exertional asthma, one leg smaller than the other is betting on running a marathon.

A 42 km course seems unthinkable for many people but not for me. The beginning is hard and it always is, but when you want it you can and everyone must have these sentences in mind.

1: Even go for a run if it’s only a mile. 2: Continue without giving up, after a month the progress is dazzling. 3: Prepare a plan for a 5km or a 10km 4: Continue training and prepare the future 42km plan which takes at least 12 weeks. 5: The important thing is to have fun and realize the efforts made and tell yourself that you will always be better than someone who does nothing!

Believe in yourself! Believe in your potential! If you want to follow my training and complete his 42km together: mb_running62

Good luck everyone”

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Female Humans of HIIT Running

Sarah Sorbek

“Never take your health for granted.

It can disappear in an instant. I grew up as an athlete – competitive gymnastics followed by competitive swimming. I then got into racing triathlons in 2003 at age 19. Sadly in the beginning of 2004 my health started declining very quickly, and for 4 years I had no answers. Finally in 2008 I was diagnosed with endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, and eventually adenomyosis.

I had to take 10 years off from sports of any kind, and I was barely able to be active at all – some days even walking was a huge challenge. I fought hard for 10 years to get my health and quality of life back, and I looked forward to racing again! I refused to let illness take over my life permanently.

I’ve happily been back to training and racing since late 2013, and loving every minute! I’ve also started trail running which I love, and I’ve done a half marathon and will be doing my second on Christmas Day! Friends and family ask me why I push my body so hard, and my answer is always, because for 10 years I couldn’t.

I will keep pushing as long as I can, to prove to myself I’m still capable.”

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Family Female Gym Training Humans of HIIT Mental Health Running

Claire Whitfield

“As a child I never really took part or particularly enjoyed exercise apart from PE at school because you had no choice. I was a bit of a rebel as a child and was smoking by the age of 12, shocking I know, it disgusts me now, but at 12 years old, and mixing with the wrong crowd and an older sibling who also smoked, well I guess I didn’t know any better. 

I started running about 17 years ago just after quitting smoking. I didn’t want to gain weight so I joined a gym and started running on a Treadmill. I was very slim but so unfit I could only run for about a minute without stopping. I continued pushing and upping the time on the Treadmill and when I managed a whole 25 minutes I was chuffed to bits.

I lost my dad suddenly 2 years later in 2005 at the age of 55, he was a smoker and didn’t have the healthiest lifestyle, we also have a family history of heart disease /failure, so I wanted to improve my health and fitness even more. 

My first official race was the Greggs children cancer charity run in Gosforth, a 5k Cross country run in May 2009, I also took part in this run for the following 3 years. I then entered the Great North Run for 2012 but had to defer until 2013 due to a prolapse and bulging discs in my back. This was a huge set back for me as I was unable to run for 3 months and even after this time it was a gradual increase in activity over the next 6 – 8 months to gain my strength and fitness back. Mentally this was really hard as I was on crutches for 2 months and in chronic pain . To help me get through this I took long walks on my crutches and carried out the strength and stretching exercises the physio gave me to keep my mind focused on recovering. 

I ran my first half marathon (GNR) in 2013, my biggest achievement at this point, in a time of 2hrs 7 minutes. 

I ran this in memory of my dad and my uncle who had died 4 years earlier of cancer. I always remember crossing that finish line and being overwhelmed with emotions, a mixture of pride and sadness. I then went on to complete the GNR again in 2016 and 2019. I also completed the Hamsterley Forest half marathon which was brutal, 3 miles up steep terrain which I completed in 2hr 10m, my hardest achievement by far. 

I run 5-6 times a week, covering around 40 – 60 miles a week. I love how a morning run sets me up mentally for my entire day. I have entered the Manchester Marathon for next October which will be my first ever marathon. Excited but nervous is an understatement.

I set up a Facebook group & my IG page to help inspire and motivate others to increase their activity, whether that’s running, walking, cycling  whatever they prefer to give them a healthier lifestyle. From my experience consistency is most definitely the key to success.

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Family Humans of HIIT Male Running Weight Loss

Brian Schembri

“6 years ago, I had a hard time keeping up with my kids playing in the backyard. I was tired and out of breath. I decided I needed to lose weight and I began running. I ran my first kilometer, and I was so tired, that I could not move off of the couch for half an hour afterwards. However, I kept at it, and began going for longer distances. I lost almost 50 pounds, and have since run many marathons. My goal one day is to qualify to run in the Boston Marathon, and I also want to complete a full Ironman. The most interesting thing that has happened to me on my journey, is how it ended up encouraging so many others, including my three sons. All three have run in various events now, and they are all continuously training for a better lifestyle.”

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Female Gym Training Humans of HIIT Personal Trainers Running Weight Loss Workouts Classes

Tamara Olaniyan

 

“I had a relationship with fitness but it was sporadic. I took fitness seriously in spurts: when I needed to enlist in the military. Before that, I ran track in high school but not seriously. When I was discharged, my health took a nose-dive. I did not feel good about myself and when things didn’t go well, I turned to food. Food was my very best friend. I joined a gym because I didn’t like how I look and how tight my clothes fit. The bigger I bought my clothes, the more I was buying bigger clothes since I outgrew my clothes within months. At my heaviest, I was 210 pounds. 

Getting stuck with a year of personal training was the “best”, overlooked mistake I could have made. Two awesome women personal trainers assisted me on my journey. I learned the same way I made time to engage in other activities, I would have to learn to schedule and prioritize fitness. When I started putting my exercise workouts on my calendar, I became more accountable and made less excuses for working out. Even now with gyms closed, I use the weights in my house, download a fitness app on the phone, and get my workout in. Either way, 6 days a week for at least 45 minutes, I am going to engage in some type of HITT, strength training, or cardio. I give myself one day of active recovery and rest. For fun, I like to run races. I see it all as a great way to help with my depression and anxiety and to allow myself “me time” when I will not allow myself to be disturbed. I allow myself to be selfish during my workout times. 

What has really inspired me is seeing other women who have embraced weight training, like my former personal trainers. I always thought if women lifted heavy weights, they would look like “She-Hulk”. I learned later it’s not the case. My hat is always off when I see other women doing their thing in fitness, especially women of color. It’s a great feeling and maybe it will open the door for others to put health and fitness in the top 5.”

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Female Gym Training Humans of HIIT Mental Health Physical Impairment Running Sport University Workouts Classes

Holly Clyne

“I’ve not always had my disability, in fact, growing up I was extremely sporty. I did karate lessons, signed up for every event at sports day, ran charity runs and eventually even got into my county Badminton team! That was an amazing achievement for me as despite my love of sport, I never really had much aptitude for it – especially running – but hey, it’s the taking part that counts right?

As I got older I tried all sorts of exercise classes, gym workouts and developed a love for mountaineering. Indoor climbing is by far what I miss the most these days. I was diagnosed with a mild case of M.E. in my third year of university, and to be honest, I kind of ignored it. Boy did I live to regret that. You can’t beat M.E. you see, thanks to the main symptom of Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) – which basically means the more I exert myself, the more ill I am. So as I continued to work hard and exercise hard, ignoring the signals my body was sending me, and using painkillers and drugs to mask my body’s cries to stop, I just became increasingly ill.

I unfortunately now have a moderate case of M.E. which heavily restricts what I can do. Even small activities can trigger PEM. I have a perching stool in the kitchen for washing up, but I still have to spend a few hours resting afterwards as my entire upper-body will feel like I’ve been lifting weights. I recently purchased a coverless duvet because changing bed sheets left me feeling worse than that time I did a half marathon years ago. I even cut most of my hair off because of the exertion of washing and styling it. Theoretically I could still go climb a wall, but I would ‘crash’ afterwards, becoming extremely ill and bedridden for days or weeks. So traditional exercise is kind of off the table…

With M.E. you can only really talk about activity rather than exercise, because things like washing up may now be a major workout for you. However, M.E. varies a LOT in severity, so you’ll sometimes see individuals with the mildest cases still doing low impact workouts, but the most severe of us are permanently confined to bed. It’s kind of like putting pins & needles and paralysis on the same scale.

I still struggle with doing any kind of activity for activities sake, most of my limited energy is used up on day-to-day living activities. But I’m trying to get into the habit of doing something, even if it’s once or twice a week, sometimes not even that. I like to do 5 minute ‘yoga’, though it’s basically 90% child’s pose. Essentially I get a yoga mat out and do some stretches. I think this helps, as I spend so much time sat still, inactive, that I think my body just starts cramping up, but I can’t really say for sure. I do know that mentally it makes a difference, it makes me feel like I haven’t given up, like there’s still something I can do, it reminds me that I’m not being lazy, that I want to do more, it’s just not good for me.

If anyone else with M.E. reads this, I can’t give you much advice because of how varied our symptoms are. Just make sure to listen to your body. Don’t push it. I know society teaches us that we should push harder, that we shouldn’t take a day off unless we’re really ill, the whole ‘no pain no gain’ but sometimes that backfires. Sometimes your body just can’t take it and if you don’t listen you’ll only make things worse. Had I stopped and listened, maybe I would still be able to work part-time at least, do some of those low impact workouts, be able to make it up a single flight of stairs without stopping to rest.

So that’s my story. Listen to your body, work with it, not against it, do what you as an individual can, and forget what others can do. For most people, exercise is worthwhile and good for your health, but that doesn’t mean you have to go all out. Just getting a walk into your day is good enough for some. We’re all made differently.”

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Cancer Humans of HIIT Male Running Sport

Rob McMurdo

“From being 5 For 22 years I played football, week in and week out. I started to lose the excitement that football gave me and so aged 28 I gave up. I searched for something to get me excited – swimming, cycling, rowing and nothing did.. 

Then aged 29 having started to get out of shape I was diagnosed with testicular cancer.. the NHS were amazing and within a week I was operated on, as I lay in the recovery room out of shape and blown away by what had just happened I decided at that point I would become fitter than I had ever been in my life. 

After a couple of months of rehab and not being allowed to exercise I found Parkrun, the rest was history.. I increased my running until I was running every day, then I tried a half marathon, it never stopped and before I knew it I was signed up for a full marathon. Fast forward 3 years and I am fitter than I have ever been, complete 20+ half’s, 2 marathons, have a 5k time of sub 19 mins and have run circa 2800 miles. 

I will always remember the time when I was rock bottom, unfit, unable to exercise and remember how it made me feel.. I run every day and Inspire others to do the same. The goal for the next 2 years is to complete an Ironman and complete the journey of Illness to Ironman.”